Do you know someone who would like to receive Reiki?

Reiki box

Just as some spiritual practitioners hold prayer circles or have a list of people who have made requests for healing,  so, too, do many Reiki practitioners. I have a decorative box that is infused with Reiki energy (see image above) that I created for this purpose. When someone makes a request, I write their name and geographical location on a slip of paper and then place it within this box. Since Reiki naturally flows where it is needed, you don’t have to specify why you are requesting it for yourself or another; however, focused intention does further guide the energy.

If you – or someone you know – are open to receiving Reiki, please use the form below or email me at tlrelf@gmail.com and I will include you in my special group Reiki sessions. Donations of any amount are welcome.

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Bringing Order to Chaos: From Grocery Shopping to Your Table and Beyond

 

When was the last time you just sat down and enjoyed a meal—or even a glass of water or juice—without multi-tasking? Perhaps you do linger over weekend brunches and an occasional leisurely dinner with family and friends, but how often does this actually happen?

And what about grocery shopping? Do you tend to shop when you’re hungry, stressed, a gazillion thoughts running through your mind? Are the kids in tow vying for your attention and you forgot your list?

Since day-to-day life can be challenging – even overwhelming – at times, you probably have a set routine that works perfectly for you, right? You love order, being in-control, and having a feeling of accomplishment, so deviating from those set routines may seem like wandering into unfamiliar territory.

But what if all you need is a new way of approaching these tasks? Curious?

In non-hierarchical order, here are a few practices that just might assist you with bringing order to that chaos.

Expressing Gratitude

While this may seem like a traditional Judaeo-Christian practice (i.e., saying Grace or a Blessing), expressing gratitude—for the meal itself as well as the origins of the food— doesn’t necessarily have to be grounded in any particular religious or spiritual doctrine. Many Buddhists, for example, will chant the Refuge vow before eating their meals, followed by a dedication of merit. When surrounded by family and friends, you have a wonderful opportunity to give thanks to—and for—the people in your life as well as the food and drink itself.

Growing Your Own Food and Herbs

You don’t need to own a farm to grow some, if not all, of your own fruits, vegetables, and herbs. Tending a garden of any kind—even a window box of medicinal and cooking herbs— is an opportunity to be aware of the growth cycle as well as a way to control what you put in your body. Furthermore, when you grow even a portion of your own food, such as a raised bed of assorted greens, onions, radishes, tomatoes, and artichokes, there is a definite sense of satisfaction when it’s time to harvest. You can even share or trade your extra bounty with others.

Focused Grocery Shopping

Do you decide what meals you want to make ahead of time, and then prepare a list? Do you follow this list to the letter? Or, do you change your mind based on what’s available—or what looks more appealing? Perhaps you’re also one of those indiviuals who sees grocery shopping as an adventure as you walk up-and-down each aisle to see what’s on sale or to explore new ingredients.

Yes, shopping can feel like a routine, even mundane, part of your life. And yes, you are going to be in different moods depending on how busy the store is, what else you need to do that day, and so forth and so on. Consider, however, the effect a positive state-of-mind can have on what you purchase and how you prepare it.

Honoring Hunger

Sometimes, you may choose to ignore your hunger pangs because you don’t want to interrupt what you’re doing. You may even feel annoyed by being hungry. Hunger, however, is usually a sign that you need sustenance.

When you answer this call, do you just wolf down something over the kitchen sink, or do you prepare yourself a healthy meal? If it’s between meals, and you’re focusing on attaining an ideal or optimum healthy weight, do you grab a piece of fruit or have a few slices of leftover pizza?

Have you considered checkiing in with your body when you’re hungry, taking a moment to ask yourself what you need versus what you want? How you want to feel after you’ve eaten? Energized? Satisfied? Relaxed?

Sending Reiki and Positive Intentions

Are you a Reiki student or practitioner? If so, then you probably practice self-healing on a daily basis. In addition, you likely send Reiki to the food and drink you prepare as well as the friends and family who are enjoying it with you.

If you’re not a Reiki practitioner, you can still hold a positive intention that the food you prepare and serve will be nourishing and nurturing. This mindfulness practice can have a wonderful, positive impact on your wellbeing as well as those around you.

So, the next time you discover that you’re rushing through the grocery store, taking bites of salad while checking email and making phone calls or postponing having family and friends over for a real, home-cooked meal, take a moment to consider the alternatives. Just allow yourself to imagine how wonderful it will feel to just relax and savor the moment.

 

 

Guest Blog at Thero.org

My guest blog, “Increase Self-Awareness and Discovery Through Journal Writing,” has just been posted at Thero.org. This non-profit organization assists individuals with finding mental health resources and has a number of excellent blog posts and other helpful services – including connecting mental health practitioners with writers and editors.

What are your full – and new moon -rituals?

As I’m preparing to perform my own full and new moon rituals, I felt it would be a wonderful time to share. When you send your rituals, insights, and observations to me, I will post them to my site so  others may learn more about this powerful time. If you would like to remain anonymous, that’s fine for posting; however, I would like to gift a Reiki session or Reading to someone chosen “at random.”

Please send your guest posts to me at tlrelf@gmail.com.

Jealousy and Envy – What Might They Teach Us?

I admit to feeling jealousy from time-to-time – and envy, too. Much less now than when I was younger, though. Recently, however, I discovered some corners of my life where they still linger and have been making a conscious effort to learn  – and apply – the lessons they provide.

While I really don’t need to go into my personal lists, past or present, I just wanted to say that for most of my life, I have focused on avoiding  – and NOT FEELING – jealousy and envy.

Why? For one, because I didn’t like the way I felt when I experienced these emotions, for two, because I was taught to be grateful for what I had,  for three, because I wanted to be happy for others, and for four, they can create a toxic environment in our minds and bodies. I could go on, but you get the idea.

When I was on my gratitude walk today, I found myself pondering these emotions and how, when they arise in ourselves or others, they provide a powerful opportunity for growth and insight. We are also provided with an opportunity to release the cords so that we are free from patterns that no longer serve us.

When jealousy and envy arise, these emotions can also shine a light into what we want. Is it possible we don’t feel that we deserve it – whatever it is? That our wants, desires – and needs – are out of reach or too challenging to accomplish?

The next time you experience even a glimmer of these emotions, ask yourself what message they might have for you.

 

Reiki for World Peace

Each and every moment, we have an opportunity to pray – or send Reiki – for world peace. Whether or not you believe in a Higher Power, I just want to let you all know, that the collective power of positive thinking, of focusing on healing and transformation for the greatest good, definitely makes a difference. . .

Explore this in your daily life and experience the shift.

Being with Grief

The deeper that sorrow carves into your being, the more joy you can contain.

-Khalil Gibran, The Prophet

We all experience grief differently, each in our own way.

After the initial experience that gives rise to grief, such as the loss of a child or parent, the end of a friendship, or a major life transition that alters the landscape of our lives, the feeling might linger for weeks, sometimes months – even years. Even though we may consciously believe our grief has passed, it may arise when we are reminded of what happened.

Healing is a process and can’t – and shouldn’t – be  rushed. . .There’s so much more to it than a “coming to terms.” The circumstances surrounding our loss also affect how we grieve and for how long. Each situation is unique.

If we attempt to rush the process, we aren’t allowing ourselves time and space to properly heal, and so when another loss occurs, our grief is compounded. It’s possible, too, not to know that we’re still grieving until we create the space to acknowledge it, to allow the memories and feelings to arise. It can seem preferable to want to stuff those feelings so that we can deal with our day-to-day lives, to “move on,” as the saying goes. . .

And yet we may not move on as we’re stuck in the past, in our feelings, our pain.

If we’ve lost someone we loved, when we’re ready, we can focus on the joy that we experienced with that person, the time we spent with them and what they meant – and still mean – to us. If we  lose a job or retire from a meaningful career, we can do the same, and when ready, search for a new position that may bring us even more fulfillment.

If the source of our grief is being abused, abandoned, betrayed, or otherwise harmed by another, then part of the grief process may include forgiveness. Sometimes, this process needs to begin with ourself. . .Rather than blaming ourselves – or others –  for being in a situation that caused harm, we can choose to forgive, and learn the lesson so that it isn’t repeated.

Being with our grief is the first step toward healing. Accepting that we grieve and being kind and loving to ourself, nurturing ourself. It’s also important to reach out to others so that we are not alone. This can seem like an overwhelming task, especially when we are filled with raw emotions and feelings that linger, seeming to pervade every aspects of our lives.

The pain will pass when we allow it to. And when we do, we can choose to feel joy in our lives again.

 

 

 

 

What puts a smile on your face?

Last night, I found myself feeling grateful for so many people, situations, and experiences in my life. . .I decided to post a question to my Facebook page: “What puts a smile on your face?” I’ve received a wealth of responses that also put a smile on my face. . .

So I ask all of you now. . .what makes you smile?

 

What are your daily rituals?

. . .and how do they prepare you for the day?

There are so many daily rituals within which people engage: Reiki self-healing, gratitude walks, meditation, contemplation, prayer, chanting, journal writing and journaling, yoga, T’ai Chi, Chi Gung et al. Others may wash dishes, vacuum, dust, rearrange a room – or their entire house. Still others may work on their dream boards or create and revise goals lists, checking them off once accomplished. Then there’s the crawl out of bed, make coffee, stare into space until your stomach rumbles so you feed it, brush your teeth, shower, get dressed, make your bed, and so on and so forth.

Whatever your morning, afternoon, night – or middle of the night rituals – may be, take a moment to consider the difference they make in your day-to-day life. Do they energize you? Empower you? Inspire you? Center you? Connect you with others?

 

 

Talk a Gratitude Walk

Yesterday, at my networking group, we had a local meditation instructor walk the group through a beginning guided meditation. The ice breaker for the day was “how do you release stress?” When it was my turn, while I did list Reiki, meditation, walking, yoga et al, I forgot to mention my gratitude walks. . .

What’s a gratitude walk? It’s really simple. . .As you take a walk around your yard, your block, in the mountains, by the beach – or even the store or mall, focus your awareness on what’s around you – and give thanks for it. Focus, too, on your body and mind, the people in your life. The small day-to-day things as well as the major things.

Not only can this relieve stress, but it can also create a positive state-of-mind open to possibilities. When our minds and hearts are open, we are able to live in the moment as well as experience a positive can-do attitude about our tasks, our goals, our relationships et al.

I would love to hear about your gratitude walks and what you discovered!